FEMA

18 Missing Inches in New Orleans

The Department of Homeland Security, after a five-year hunt for Osama, finally brought charges against… Greg Palast.
As America crawled toward the fifth anniversary of the September 11 attack, Homeland Security charged me and my US producer Matt Pascarella with violating the anti-terror laws. Don’t you feel safer?
And I confess: we’re guilty.

New Orleans — Still Under Water

A BUZZFLASH INTERVIEW
The White House knew [the levees broke] because the Army Corps of Engineers sent them photographs. Again, I want to emphasize that the White House had the photographs of the levees breaking, and didn’t tell state and local officials who had stopped the evacuation because the hurricane missed New Orleans. Everyone thought they dodged a bullet, but the White House didn’t tell anybody the levees broke and were drowning the city. — Greg PalastDVD cover
Greg Palast is just unstoppable, and after you watch his remarkable new DVD, “Big Easy to Big Empty: The Drowning of New Orleans,” you’ll understand why.

Exxon-erated! Palast Escapes Clutches of Homeland Security

HUFFINGTON POST- EAT THE PRESS | Scott Thill
Good news from the edge of reality: Exxon has changed its mind. It was only days ago that they were employing the help of their subsidiary known as the Department of Homeland Security to put a Gitmo scare into Greg Palast and Matt Pascarella for filming the oil powerhouse’s Baton Rouge refinery — and about a thousand Katrina refugees being held behind barbed wire near it

Reporter Palast Slips Clutches of Homeland Security

September 14th, 2006
Forget the orange suit. Exxon Mobil Corporation, which admits it was behind the criminal complaint brought by Homeland Security against me and television producer Matt Pascarella, has informed me that the oil company will no longer push charges that Pascarella and I threatened “critical infrastructure.”
The allegedly criminal act, which put us on the wrong side of post-9/11 anti-terror law, was our filming of Exxon’s Baton Rouge refinery where, nearby, 1,600 survivors of Hurricane Katrina remain interned behind barbed wire.

A Taste of Palast's Armed MadHouse: 1927. Again.

t r u t h o u t | Book Preview

Excerpted from Armed Madhouse, a new book by Greg Palast.

1927. Again.
The National Public Radio news anchor was so excited I thought she’d pee herself: The President of the United States had flown his plane down to 1,700 feet to get a better look at the flood damage! Later, I saw the photo of him looking out of the window of Air Force One. The President looked very serious and concerned. That was on Wednesday, August 31, 2005, two days after the levees broke and Lake Ponchartrain swallowed New Orleans.