ExxonMobil

Exxon suxx. McCain duxx.

Nineteen goddamn years is enough. I’m sorry if you don’t like my language, but when I think about what they did to

Exxon-erated! Palast Escapes Clutches of Homeland Security

HUFFINGTON POST- EAT THE PRESS | Scott Thill
Good news from the edge of reality: Exxon has changed its mind. It was only days ago that they were employing the help of their subsidiary known as the Department of Homeland Security to put a Gitmo scare into Greg Palast and Matt Pascarella for filming the oil powerhouse's Baton Rouge refinery — and about a thousand Katrina refugees being held behind barbed wire near it

Reporter Palast Slips Clutches of Homeland Security

September 14th, 2006
Forget the orange suit. Exxon Mobil Corporation, which admits it was behind the criminal complaint brought by Homeland Security against me and television producer Matt Pascarella, has informed me that the oil company will no longer push charges that Pascarella and I threatened “critical infrastructure.”
The allegedly criminal act, which put us on the wrong side of post-9/11 anti-terror law, was our filming of Exxon's Baton Rouge refinery where, nearby, 1,600 survivors of Hurricane Katrina remain interned behind barbed wire.

Palast Charged With Journalism in The First Degree

September 11, 2006Not Greg and Matt
It's true. It's weird. It's nuts. The Department of Homeland Security, after a five-year hunt for Osama, has finally brought charges against… Greg Palast. I kid you not. Send your cakes with files to the Air America wing at Guantanamo.
Though not just yet. Fatherland Security has informed me that television producer Matt Pascarella and I have been charged with unauthorized filming of a “critical national security structure” in Louisiana.

Big Oil and the Trillion-Dollar War Bonus

excerpted from, “Armed Madhouse” (Penguin 2006)

It has been a very good war for Big Oil — courtesy of OPEC price hikes. The five oil giants saw profits rise from $34 billion in 2002 to $81 billion in 2004, year two of Iraq's “transition to democracy.”
But this tsunami of black ink was nothing compared to the wave of $113 billion in profits to come in 2005: $13.6 billion for Conoco, $14.1 billion for Chevron and the Mother of All Earnings, Exxon's $36.1 billion.

Blood in Beirut: $75.05 a Barrel

mideastmapThe failure to stop the bloodletting in the Middle East, Exxon's record second-quarter profits and Iran's nuclear cat-and-mouse game have something in common — it's the oil.

The Guardian
I can't tell you how it started — this is a war that's been fought since the Levites clashed with the Philistines — but I can tell you why the current mayhem has not been stopped. It's the oil.

Why Palast Is Wrong – And Why The Oil Companies Don't Want You to Know it

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HubbertGuerilla News Network – Excerpt from Armed Madhouse
Now that I've convinced you that the Peak Oil crowd is crackers, let me disagree with myself. We can't understand the new class war unless we understand why oil, a certain kind at least, has in fact “peaked.”
We've long jumped over Hubbert's predicted peak and, in 2006, rolled our SUVs right through the “culmination”- that is, used the last drops of the one-and-a-quarter-trillion barrels of liquid crude the good Earth can provide according to the Hubbert jeremiad. Furthermore, “The rise in the production of power from nuclear energy for the United States” ran out long before uranium's five-thousand-year reign, despite Hubbert's hope and prediction.